Spies within

 

To the editor,

 

It’s called “Echelon,” a reciprocal surveillance agreement started in 1947 between Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and United States to eavesdrop on cold war enemies. Through the process of perceived national emergencies and gradualism it grew to include your phone too. You see it’s illegal for our government to wire tap its own citizens but by circumventing the law by treaties with “friendly” countries the lines were opened so “foreigners” could tap us, then hand over the information to our government. We of course did the same for them. All accomplished using the “Supremacy Clause” contained in the Constitution, Article VI “… and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.”

So for decades our government has allowed and assisted foreign countries to gather information from our phones and computers, under the guise of protecting us from foreign countries. What other agencies have access to the same phone/Internet records? Think of the military secrets, trade secrets and your secrets that were never “secret.” A computer technician could make a fortune with these recorded taps. With such sensitive information the blackmailing of any politician, judge, corporate executive would be easy and lucrative. What would stop the “friendly” countries from selling the electronic information to “unfriendly” countries or to the highest bidder? History has confirmed allies can and do turn into enemies. How do you protect yourself? How can you prevent the capturing of your information through the air? How can the taps ever be turned off? Who could be trusted with this on/off switch? Has technology or its misuse gone too far? Who knows? Well the NSA/others with active taps know, or to be politically correct, the foreigners know.

 

Shawn Carroll

Dillon